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25 07 2017 Is It Rude to Wake Your Snoring Partner?

wake-partner

A snoring partner is one of the most often reported causes of disturbed sleep. Snores from a bed-partner can be as loud as trying to sleep next with a vacuum cleaner. So is it rude to wake someone who snores when they’re robbing you of a good night’s sleep?

A good night’s sleep is essential not just to your performance the next day, but also to your long-term health. Sleep is when your tired brain detoxifies itself by cleaning out the waste products of its daytime activities.

If these toxic wastes are allowed to build up, you could increase your risk of a range of neurological disorders including dementia and Alzheimer’s. Research shows that your brain can only detox thoroughly when it gets a good period of continuous sleep.

When you sleep, your brain goes through a series of ‘sleep cycles’. During these cycles your brain allows more cerebrospinal fluid to flow through it carrying away its toxic waste. This cleansing stops every time a sleep cycle is broken.

If your partner’s snoring wakes you up several times a night your sleep cycles may be continually broken. And that’s only one of the ways your partner’s snoring could be putting your health at risk.

Sleep science research is discovering more and more links between disturbed sleep and a range of conditions, diseases and disorders.

What To Do If Your Partner’s Snoring Keeps You Awake!

Clearly, if your partner knew the risk to your health caused by their snoring, they would do their best to stop. But the chances are they are unaware of their own snoring, let alone its potential effect on your health.

At best, waking your snoring partner may give you only temporary relief, ending as soon as sleep returns. Waking your snoring partner may or may not seem rude to them, but it will be almost certainly ineffective in stopping their snoring.

Simply telling your partner that their snoring is their problem and demanding they sort it out, almost definitely is rude. Taking time to talk about your partner’s snoring together, as a shared problem, is probably more likely to benefit both of you.

Try explaining how your partner’s snoring is bad for you both – truth. Snoring might not wake your partner, but it’s a sign of sleep disordered breathing – maybe sleep apnoea, which could be having an even worse effect.

You can find lots of information explaining in simple terms the effect of snoring, sleep deprivation and sleep apnoea on you and your partner, on the Snoreeze website.

You’ll also find a wide range of stop-snoring aids and solutions to fit your lifestyle including Snoreeze lozenges, throat and nasal sprays, rinses and melt-in-the-mouth oral tabs. You’ll also find gently adhesive nasal strips and the Snoreeze Oral Device treatment for heavy snoring and obstructive sleep apnoea* (OSA).

 

ENDS.

*Sleep apnoea is a common disorder in which you have one or more pauses in breathing or shallow breaths while you sleep. Breathing pauses can last from a few seconds to minutes. They may occur 30 times or more an hour. Typically, normal breathing then starts again, sometimes with a loud snort or choking sound. If you suspect you have OSA, we recommend you see your doctor.

 

 

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Question

Would you like to take a brief questionnaire to see your sleep aponea risk levels?

Yes
No
Question One of Eight

Complete the following clinically approved screening questionnaire to find out if you are at risk of suffering from sleep apnoea.

Do you snore loudly? (Louder than talking, or loud enough to be heard through closed doors)

Yes
No
Question Two of Eight

Do you often feel tired, fatigued, or sleepy during daytime?

Yes
No
Question Three of Eight

Gender - Are you male?

Yes
No
Question Four of Eight

Has anyone observed you stop breathing during your sleep?

Yes
No
Question Five of Eight

Do you have or are you being treated for high blood pressure?

Yes
No
Question Six of Eight

Body Mass Index (BMI) more than 35?

Yes
No
Question Seven of Eight

Are you over the age of 50?

Yes
No
Question Eight of Eight

Is your neck circumference greater than: Male - 17" or 43cm? Female - 15" or 41cm?

Yes
No
Question Eight of Eight

You are at
risk of Obstructive Sleep Apnoea (OSA).